How Temperature Affects Workplace Productivity Infographic


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Speedrack West Announces the Release of Rack Safety: How-to Inspect Your Pallet Rack

Speedrack West has published a comprehensive infographic entitled “Rack Safety: How-to Inspect Your Pallet Rack” to provide information on a basic understanding of pallet rack safety.

With this infographic, Speedrack West informs people on many aspects of pallet rack safety. To accurately educate people on pallet rack safety, the infographic covers information on beams, frames, anchors, permits, seismic calculations, and employee training.

Pallet rack shelving has specific safety requirements that should not be taken lightly. Each shelf should have a capacity label to indicate the maximum load per level, and beams should be connected to frames by at least 3 pins. Warehouse rack over 5’9” must have a permit for installation and usage, and the permit must include seismic calculations specific to the geographical area.

Training employees on how to correctly use pallet rack shelving is critical to maintaining a safe warehouse. Employee training should include forklift driving, loading and unloading pallet racks, signs of pallet rack damage, weight capacities, and the dangers of overloading.

“Pallet racking is an excellent way to increase the efficiency of any warehouse, but it is important that proper safety requirements are met,” said Speedrack West Vice President Chris Jones. “By taking the time to correctly install pallet rack and train employees on proper usage, you can safely and efficiently increase your warehouse storage space.”

Tullibardine Distillery: Excellent Build Quality and Promise of Reliability made Crown the Single Choice

keg and barrel attachment

Application

Located in the Scottish Highlands, the Tullibardine Highland Scotch Malt Whisky distillery produces, ships and sells globally over three million liters of acclaimed whiskey per year. It is one of the few distilleries in Scotland to distill, mature and bottle all on one site. Operating in warehousing and storage areas where whiskey vapor emissions can be present, it was essential that any material handling equipment operating at the facility could be easily adapted with fire protection systems which provide audible and visual warnings of potential fire hazards.

Challenge

A varied range of indoor and outdoor handling tasks, plus working in confined and sometimes hazardous conditions called for a versatile choice of handling equipment to ensure optimum productivity while keeping costs under control. As whiskey is slowly maturing, roughly two percent evaporates through the wooden cask and into the atmosphere. And above all, the equipment had to be dependable day-in, day-out across all areas of the distillery, from incoming products and raw materials, specialist storage requirements, right through to despatch of the finished product worldwide.

Solution

The key factor in awarding Crown Lift Trucks the contract to supply Tullibardine with material handling equipment was its ability to meet the specialist requirements of a whiskey distillery – in particular where barrel-handling applications were concerned. The Tullibardine fleet includes Crown’s C-5 Series gas forklift which performs multiple tasks throughout the site. It is fitted with a specialist rotating barrel clamp, providing smooth, precise handling and ease of operation to ensure operator productivity is maximized. Featuring Crown’s low-emission 2.4-liter industrial engine, a robust hydrodynamic transaxle and dual radiator cooling system, the C-5 Series delivers extended service intervals and reduced costs.

Compact dimensions make Crown’s SC Series three-wheel electric forklift perfectly suited to indoor applications where space is at a premium. With a near zero-turn radius and outstanding visibility, operators can accurately position the SC Series in even the tightest aisles. In the confines of the Tullibardine bonded warehouse, its nimble gait and precise controllability come into their own. Fitted with a tilting cask-kicker attachment, the SC Series affords the operator maximum control while lifting the cask to the correct height before tilting and accurately rolling it into position in the storage racks.

From an operational point of view, this vapor in the air can potentially be a hazard. The Crown trucks are fitted with a system which can shut down the truck if vapor levels rise above a pre-set limit, preventing it from being the source of ignition for an explosion.

Results

  • Tullibardine benefits from extended service intervals and reduced costs with Crown’s versatile C-5 Series LPG-powered forklift, which features a robust hydrodynamic transaxle and dual radiator cooling system.
  • Operators are well cared for with Crown’s Intrinsic Stability System™ which proactively ensures optimal safety and performance – and their acceptance of the trucks has been excellent.
  • The operator’s cabin provides excellent visibility. Hydraulic levers with tactile feedback ensure the interchangeable rotating barrel clamp can be positioned with absolute precision, allowing safe and secure handling of potentially awkward loads.

“We ship our products all over the world, so it was vitally important that our material handling fleet was going to be reliable,” concludes John Torrence, Distillery Manager, Tullibardine Distillery. “From the start, I was impressed with the quality of the Crown product. We have an excellent working relationship, and the trucks are living up to their reputation.”

 

 

Can the Right Forklifts Give Your Business a Lift? An update on technology advances and ideas about whether to buy new or used—or to lease

From autonomous forklifts to new ergonomic and energy features, suppliers continue to innovate ways to save time and boost production. Consider if your forklift equipment has kept up with the times.

forklift technologies, new or used, lease or buy

Photo credit: Pallet Enterprise Magazine

 

Full disclosure, I first stepped into the path of an oncoming autonomous forklift about three years ago, and I did it on purpose.

I was visiting a production plant in Sweden, and my host urged me onto the facility floor to start my tour. But then I froze. I was looking for the painted path—the designated pedestrian pathway, but there was none to be seen. Several forklifts were crossing back and forth, moving skids of crates and stacking them. There were no operators. “Come on,” she said. “They’ll work around us.” I took a breath and followed.

Read more at Pallet Enterprise.

Raymond Handling Announces Safety Show Off Winner

Treetop, Inc. Promotes Safety by Taking Extra Precautions with Warehouse Safety

 

FREMONT, Calif., July 18, 2018. Raymond Handling Concepts Corporation (RHCC), a leading materials handling equipment supplier in Northern California and the Northwest, has announced its winner of the ‘Safety Show Offs’ contest that took place in honor of National Forklift Safety Day 2018. In addition to being recognized, RHCC provided Treetop, Inc. with a lunch for all 27 employees catered by Tacos El Rey for the steps the company has taken to ensure safety in its warehouse.

Sponsored by the Industrial Truck Association (ITA), National Forklift Safety Day brings together forklift manufacturers, dealers and operators with the common goal of reducing accidents by increasing awareness and highlighting the need for ongoing operator training as equipment and technology changes, the importance of daily inspections and performing scheduled maintenance to ensure the equipment is maintained in a safe working condition. Other precautions are equally important, such as safe controls to increase pedestrian awareness of moving equipment.

TreeTop, Inc. took the initiative to increase awareness of moving forklifts and direction of travel by installing blue lights on all its forklifts, which illuminate when the trucks are in reverse. This gives both the operator as well as anyone in the immediate area now a clear visual of where the truck is and where it is going. In addition, Treetop requires anyone in the warehouse to wear high visibility vests for added safety.

After reviewing several customers’ submitted photos and statements on how they promote a safe workplace, Treetop was selected as the winner by implementing a dual-step measure to increase safety. This commitment underscores why National Forklift Safety Day continues to be a key industry observation.

Raymond Handling Concepts Corporation continues to stay committed to and support forklift safety, not only during the national holiday but always.

To view RHCC’s Top 10 Forklift Safety Tips, click here: https://raymondhandling.com/national-forklift-safety-day/

For additional information on the company, please visit www.raymondhandling.com. Connect with Raymond Handling Concepts on Twitter @RaymondHandling, on Facebook, on Google + and on LinkedIn.

Crown Equipment Helps SaltWorks® Maximize Lift Truck and Battery Utilization

forklift battery optimization

Source: Crown

Saltworks takes advantage of Crown V-Force® chargers and InfoLink® fleet and operator management to optimize forklift battery utilization

SaltWorks®, the largest gourmet sea salt manufacturer in the world, needed a solution that would enable them to maximize the return on investment of their new electric forklift fleet. Crown Equipment, one of the world’s largest material handling companies, helped the company better understand and manage the utilization of its fleet and batteries.

SaltWorks imports sea salt from 25 different countries, processes it into more than 110 varieties and redistributes the product globally. The company, which handles about 200,000 to 250,000 pounds of salt per day, originally relied on a fleet of used LPG internal combustion forklifts. After experiencing frequent unexpected downtime due to poor reliability, the company purchased a new electric fleet of Crown application-specific forklifts, including sit-down counterbalance trucks, stackers and pallet trucks. They also invested in a bank of Crown’s V-Force® chargers to provide the versatility they needed to charge every forklift in their fleet.

The company also outfitted each forklift with Crown’s InfoLink® fleet and operator management to help ensure operational efficiency with the new electric fleet. They used the system to control operator access, improve compliance documentation and monitor truck utilization, capturing fleet utilization data in real time. This enabled SaltWorks to know exactly when and how the trucks were being used to identify opportunities for efficiency gains. Crown’s Battery Health Monitor was also added to remotely monitor battery utilization and health, and help the company perform load balancing to maximize the fleet’s battery efficiency.

“The performance of our forklifts is key to the performance of our business,” said Colin McLane, SaltWorks engineering manager. “Being able to monitor the charge of each forklift independently allows us to balance the load. That way, if we notice one truck is performing in a very high duty role, we can switch that truck out for one that’s been used in a lighter duty role to maximize battery efficiency.”

To find out more, visit the Crown website.

Latest ProGMA Video Highlights Loading Dock Hazards: 42% of Forklift Accidents Involve Workers Getting Pinned by Tipping Vehicles

 

The Protective Guarding Manufacturers Association (ProGMA), a product group within trade association Material Handling Industry (MHI), is promoting the third in a series of educational videos about preventing accidents and injuries at loading docks. The videos can be seen at mhi.org/progma/videos.

Following ‘Essential Safety Barriers for Automated / Robotic Workcells’ and ‘Proper Safeguarding for Elevated Work Platforms’, the latest video titled, ‘Prevent Accidents and Injuries Near Loading Docks / Doors’, focuses on the busiest and most dangerous area of a facility. The 2:05min-long video provides a visual interpretation of a busy, working loading dock, highlighting the inherent hazards involved with the fast-moving environment.

Ray Niemeyer, chairman of ProGMA and director of business development at SpaceGuard Products, said: “The loading dock is the most active area of any facility; if a company isn’t shipping and receiving product, it isn’t making money. It is here where personnel either on foot or riding powered operated equipment can find themselves in dangerous situations, unless proper protective guarding and safety equipment are installed. Buildings and product can also be damaged.”

The video starts with an alarming statistic that 42% of forklift accidents involve workers getting pinned by vehicles tipping over. It also states that a single forklift accident can lead to $100,000+ in related costs. The animation goes on to address the potential for employees, products, or moving equipment to fall off the dock at an unprotected door. ProGMA members offer safety gates, mesh door netting, bumpers, bollards, guardrails, truck wheel guides, truck driver cages, and other products that keep personnel and product safe, directly contributing to a company’s bottom line.

ProGMA hopes floor managers, health and safety managers, upper management, and shift workers will gain knowledge through the visual content. In just over two minutes, the video successfully walks target audiences through the entire loading dock environment, from outside spaces where larger trucks maneuver in tight areas, to the bustling aisles and traffic ways of a typical high-traveled loading dock-and everything in between.

Niemeyer said: “The causes, severity, and types of potential accident are varied. Worker safety and protective guarding equipment should not be seen as a cost but an investment that not only ensures people go home to their families at night but also reduces cost in the yearly maintenance budget, particularly when it is designed into a facility from the outset. Be mindful that management and co-workers are left to deal with the immediate and long-term impact of a lost time accident, whilst hoping that the injured employee can return to health and their position of employment.”

There are many different types of loading dock across the U.S., depending on the kind of business activity and a building’s operational function. There may be 200 loading docks at a single site, for example. Warehousing and distribution sites will have a higher percentage of loading docks on multiple sides of a building, while a manufacturing facility might have fewer docks with a greater spread across a site to facilitate in and outbound shipments.

Niemeyer concluded: “The videos are being well received by industry employees, managers, health and safety personnel, and insurance companies. They provide a real life overview of the various areas of a company’s operation, inside and out, where guarding and protective barriers should be considered for protecting employees and the building from costly accidents and facility damage.”

The latest video can be seen at <a href=”http://mhi.org/progma/videos” target=”_blank” rel=”noopener”>mhi.org/progma/videos</a>.

 

Forklift rental? Choosing the best forklift financing option

Is forklift rental, lease or purchase right for you?

Forklifts and other materials handling equipment can be purchased with a number of repayment options, rented on a short-term basis from 90 days to 12 months, leased over several years, or purchased through your dealer, according to Alex Teager, Yale Financial Services Manager.

The advantages and disadvantages of each option are complex and are often dependent on a range of factors such as the organization’s policies, practices and the size of the operation. This is why Yale would recommend seeking professional advice, notes Teager. Information on the types of products, the working environment and quantity of vehicles ordered are taken into consideration when the financial services organization prepares the quotation.


Also read: Forklift Lease or Buy – What’s Best for Your Business?


 Material handling equipment acquisition is a big decision: get the right advice

“The acquisition method for materials handling equipment can be a big decision for any business,” Teager says. “Customers often focus on the build quality and features of products, whereas here at Yale we would encourage them to also look at the wider picture. The tailored support of the Yale® dealer can be invaluable in ensuring that the whole package is right for their particular application and situation, including how the vehicle or fleet is financed.”

“At Yale, initial consultations are carried out by Yale dealers with the team at Yale Financial Services, in conjunction with our financial partners, providing professional support and assistance from the beginning to the end of the leasing lifecycle. Yale is committed to the long-term support of its customers and with its extensive lift truck expertise offers financing solutions for new and used trucks to suit budget requirements via a range of tailored plans.”

Most lease agreements range between two and seven years in length, with a five-year contract being the most frequently selected. Repayment schedules and types of contract are flexible, meaning that the dealer can work with their customers to devise the most appropriate product selection and payment schedule for their specific needs. The finance solutions offered may include customised rental profiles in support of a customer’s cash flow requirements or inclusive rental and maintenance packages.

This determination to find the best available solution was a positive for José Manuel, from Hispania de Manutención in Spain. He said: “I have this deep appreciation for the hard work that Yale Financial Services and their finance partner DLL have been doing. Their commercial focus and energy are the key differentiators when it comes to their structuring of complex solutions and ability to distinguish themselves in a competitive marketplace.”

Look for a comprehensive range of options

Yale customers expect a comprehensive range of products and services. The financial services package and securing project financing through Yale Financial Services was a key consideration for Yale CZ in concluding a long-term contract with Skylog s.r.o., to supply materials handling equipment, rack equipment and other equipment within the warehouse operation. As Mr. Krejci from Skylog said: “One of the key factors in the final decision to conclude a contract with Yale CZ was the offer of financial services that respected our specific requirements. Effective and efficient negotiations with the representative of UniCredit, the partner of Yale Financial Services for the Czech Republic was of real benefit.”

Yale and its dealers remain on hand throughout the tenure of the agreement to provide repair and maintenance work for its products, meaning that customers can rest assured that they can receive professional and reliable servicing for the duration of their contract.

For more information on Yale Financial Services please visit www.yale.com.

Hyster Trucks Overcome Tough Tests at Sand-lime Brick Factory

From large quantities of dust to extreme temperature variations, Hyster® forklift trucks help overcome the tough conditions at Radmacher Kalksandsteine, a sand-lime brick production plant in Wendeburg, Germany.

The family business has been producing sand-lime bricks using only sand, quicklime and water since 1963. The blocks are hardened in 15-bar pressure autoclaves where more than 60 employees ensure continuous production in a three-shift, around the clock operation. Due to the demands of the application, including a climate that varies from -15°C in Winter to more than 30°C in Summer, the business tested various forklifts thoroughly before selecting new trucks.

“No stone is moved without a Hyster® forklift”

The sand-lime bricks are manufactured in standard sizes as well as in varying dimensions dependent on customer requirements and specific building plans. Hyster® trucks ensure a continuous, reliable process, from production to storage of the blocks.

“No stone is moved without a Hyster® forklift,” says Christian Baars, Production Manager at the plant, who is especially pleased with two new Hyster® H13XM-6 heavy-duty forklift trucks. These trucks, with a lifting capacity of 13-tonnes and a load center of 600mm, were acquired after testing several different trucks from well-known manufacturers.

Hyster® trucks handle slopes easily

While all trucks tested performed well when unloading trolleys and equipping saws, one competitor was unable to deliver the required performance working on the ramp. The heavy forklifts, fully loaded with sand-lime bricks, have to manage a short ramp with a grade of approximately 12 percent. Although some competitor trucks with strong engines managed the ramp, they consumed significantly more fuel than the Hyster® H13XM-6, which is equipped with a powerful six-cylinder Cummins QSB 6.7 litre engine.

“The engine power was not the only deciding factor though,” says Hyster Dealer Torsten Franke, Managing Director of GS-Gabelstapler Service, in Wolfenbüttel, Germany. “The truck has to be a good overall fit, from the 3-speed ZF hydrodynamic transmission to the transmission ratio.”

High performance with lower fuel consumption

“For us, the high-power reserves and low fuel consumption of the Hyster® H13XM-6 were key,” says Christian Baars. “After all the testing, we put the first forklift into use in our sand-lime brick factory in Uslar, and then ordered another 13-tonne truck, with an S + H stone clamp, to use at the Wendeburg plant.”

The state-of-the-art heavy-duty trucks, which comply with Stage IV / Tier 4 final requirements, consume around 20 percent less fuel compared to their predecessors.

Good all-round visibility is delivered by the ergonomic Hyster® cab, and further enhanced by the VISTA® mast with external chains and three, instead of four, hydraulic lines. The noise level has also been reduced, enabling the driver to concentrate during the shift.

Additionally, the wide chassis and wide drive axle ensure maximum lateral stability when using attachments.

Persuaded by the Cool Truck at Hyster® HUB

The business connection between GS Gabelstapler Service and Radmacher Kalksandsteine has developed over 30 years, with the Hyster® dealer offering advice, fast service and relevant solutions. For example, at the Hyster® HUB in Weeze, Germany, Baars was able to learn first-hand about the latest technologies, such as the Hyster® “Cool Truck”.

Based on the H4.0-5.5FT product range, Hyster has developed the Cool Truck especially for use in the dusty conditions found in the paper and recycling industry. The Cool Truck has numerous functions and adaptations to prevent the common problem of the motor overheating due to dust deposits. Hyster® heavy-duty forklift trucks, such as the 13-tonne truck at the stone works, are also designed for use in the toughest operating conditions.

Protection against dust and variable temperatures

To avoid the problems caused by dust, there is an option to extend the air inlet of the pre-filter. This reduces the amount of polluted air that is sucked in when the standard pre-filter is no longer sufficient. An automatic lubrication function can also be installed to keep dirt out.

Drivers also benefit from the Hyster® VISTA Cabin which features an easy-to-clean air filter.

Temperature fluctuations pose no problem for Hyster® forklift trucks as they leave the factory in Nijmegen, the Netherlands, ready to withstand operation at temperatures from -18°C to 50°C.

Hyster® forklifts provide up to 3,500 operating hours per year

Four Hyster® H3.0FT Fortens ICE forklift trucks are used by Radmacher Kalksandsteine to their maximum performance, reaching up to 3,500 operating hours per year. The trucks are primarily used to transport the sand-lime blocks around the site.

Equipped with Superelastic tires and the maintenance-free Hyster® Stability Mechanism (HSM), which improves side stability, the rugged Hyster® Fortens forklifts support the heavy demands of the operation.

Set to the ECO-eLO fuel efficiency mode, these are among the most fuel-efficient forklift trucks available, another deciding factor for Christian Baars.

Visit www.hyster.eu for more information.

New Warehouse Design Book Offers Insights on Pallet Racking , MHE Selection and More

How to Configure and Equip Your Warehouse: Pallet racking, industrial shelving, MHE and more are covered in a practical warehouse design “due diligence primer.”

Warehouse design practical tips offered in new bookWhen two recently retired MHE professionals connected at a social function a few years ago, little did they realize that their enduring passion for the industry would quickly catapult them into a year-long project.  Soon-to-be authors Keith MacDonald and John Binns believed they had a lot to offer emerging and current generations of warehousing professionals. Their discussion turned to the need for a self-help book about warehouse material handling systems and layouts.*

Ongoing changes and new equipment capabilities had transpired over the course of their careers and continued to be added.  These have important implications for warehouse design. For instance, rack spacing has progressed from “wide” aisles to narrow aisles and then to very narrow aisles. The tremendous increase in storage height is another example as is the awareness of the effects of building column spacing.

Authors Look to Fill a Void in Warehouse Design Information

MacDonald and Binns reasoned that warehousing professionals not involved with deciding storage and handling methods on a day-to-day basis could not be expected to be aware of all the choices available or have the know-how for the needed decisions. Warehouse decision makers are often too busy in operating their existing warehouses to keep up to date on new possibilities. While large multinational companies often have warehouse design expertise, they recognized that for many independent warehouses, there is a serious knowledge gap.

A review of available books on the warehousing topic by the authors confirmed their belief that industry professionals needed better information about warehouse design, including configuration and equipment selection. They found existing titles to be strongly skewed toward efficiently operating the facility. And although operational efficiency is critical, it is much more difficult to achieve in the absence of first understanding how to select and dimension the storage and retrieval systems which will best position the warehouse for success. Without such attention to warehouse design in the early stages, the chances of achieving the expected operating results are greatly reduced.

Further, they also recognized that the ability to select correct equipment was, in itself, not sufficient for a trouble-free installation and operation.  The hands-on learning of pitfalls and dimensioning of various types of equipment and aisle widths, which are combined to form a system, is a must. The fact that the two had been involved with many different types of equipment supplied by a large variety of manufacturers allowed them to bring this broad perspective to the discussion.

They decided that the book would have to be easy for all to follow and become a communications tool as complexity increased.  Most importantly the project manager would have to feel comfortable in using it and have others use it; to be literally “all on the same page” in their understandings of any situation. This must include the progression from “what systems to use” through “how best to use them” and on through “how to combine all the different systems and methods into an efficient layout”.

The Selection Process

To attain these difficult goals it was decided to use a modular approach, which works well for warehouse layouts. Most layouts are just a combination of square or rectangular areas called zones; with each zone being a stand-alone segment of the warehouse.

Therefore, the selection process should be to first determine the type of storage and activity required for a zone and then select the equipment and aisle width to suit. The needed area is then easily determined and each zone becomes a moveable warehouse segment. It’s length and width can be easily reconfigured to fit as many complete warehouse configurations (combinations and placements of zones) as required.

The first step is to consider the different types of goods to be stored, their physical sizes and weights and the type of activity they will require for storage and retrieval. These will be fit into different types of zones.

Types of zone activity will usually fall into one or more of these categories:

  • Pallet-In……Pallet-Out
  • Pallet-In……Pallet-Out / Cases-Out / Pieces-Out
  • Cases-In…..Cases-Out / Pieces-Out
  • Pieces-In….Pieces-Out

In order to progress from the types and needed activities of stored products to a completed layout, the authors recommend a six-step process. For enhanced clarity of the explanations, comments, and cautions, many full-page drawings were considered essential.

For each zone the selection process might then become:

1) Consider and select the preferred storage equipment.

2) Consider and select the preferred handling and order selection equipment.

3) Decide on the preferred storage aisle width. This may not be the narrowest possible. There are many considerations in deciding aisle widths.

4) Combine the storage and handling equipment with the chosen aisle. This is the basic system for a zone.

5) Then comes the very important check of all dimensions to ensure that there will not be any surprise problems. Regardless of warehouse size, the planning is based on a game of inches or fractions of an inch.  A rack bay which is ½” longer than expected can make a row of racks unacceptably long, perhaps messing up the width of access aisles or in-floor wire-guidance.  Every equipment and aisle combination should be checked by an experienced person. Quite often ”The Devil is in the  Details”.

The chances of misfits increase when a number of suppliers are involved and close attention from the project manager becomes very important.

6)  When the selections have been finalized and checked for compatibility each zone can then be inserted where wanted in the overall plan. It is here that the number and width of access aisles (“main aisles”, “cross aisles”) can be determined and the locations of building columns checked. Some suggested “fixes” are shown for instances where the columns become a problem.

The authors believe the manual achieves to a large extent the goals they set in regard to illuminating the process of warehouse configuration and equipment selection. Kirkus Reviews calls How to Configure and Equip Your Warehouse “An informative operational due-diligence primer.”

How to Configure and Equip Your Warehouse is available from a number of major book suppliers with a “look inside” on their websites.  In Canada go to friesenpress.com. Also, check it out at Amazon.com and on Google Play.

 

* For the purposes of this manual a “System” or “Storage and Handling System” is used to include any combinations of storage and handling equipment, along with the methods and aisle widths used to store and retrieve products. A warehouse may have any number of these different systems which, through a step-by-step method, are inserted into the total warehouse layout.